Some Wisdom from a Serial Entrepreneur

Kingsley Joseph is a startup enthusiast who has put his efforts into Digital Chocolate, TripThirsty, BiteMe and SalesForce.

When I asked him to name one thing he liked about Startup Festival last year, he said, “I loved the Zumba y’all made us do last year!” A bright smile ensued. Always one to appreciate a good crowd, he says the high point of his Startup Festival experience were the networking sessions and the crowd interactions.

TripThirsty is a travel wish-listing and deals portal for groups online. This free and open directory of treks, hikes and other adventure activities is one of the serial entrepreneur’s ventures which launched at last year’s LaunchPad, Startup Festival’s flagship startup platform.  

“I did overestimate the market” he says shrugging in hindsight. As a business model, it would probably have done better had the size as well as the commitment of the adventure enthusiasts’ community stretched a bit more.

A startup’s life is hard. TripThirsty is one among the few companies launched at last year’s LaunchPad in such a predicament, Kingsley has too many things on his plate and mind and says he is looking for someone with a passion for trekking and hiking to sell his beloved TripThirsty to. He feels it requires someone with a deeper commitment as well as more devoted attention and time.

Although he doesn’t now, he says there was a time in Kingsley’s life where he too, like most young people believed that you have to find your passion and work towards developing it your whole life. It’s good to specialize in things, but it is very important to have a child-like openness to your thinking too. Well… it took me 5 seconds but I guess I got what he means.

It’s sort of the ideology everyone wants to think they follow. Necessary motivation. But we forget that a single minded approach to things generally blurs our perspective. It is only with a fresh outlook can we see things and scenarios for what they are.

As an entrepreneur, it is tempting to treat any and all activities of the company as an extension of oneself. Kingsley opines that this sometimes ends up being a case of over-personalization.

After my conversation with Kingsley, I realized life’s lessons don’t always package themselves and present themselves to you. They have to be earned. Either in terms of money. Or experience.

By

KRS Rao

Rao is a part-time writer, a full time dreamer and a qualified CS. He is currently freelancing with the Construkt Team

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